How To Become A Rigger

How to become a Rigger

What does a rigger do?
A rigger is an individual in charge of assembling gear such as; scaffolding, cables and ropes on set. Riggers manufacture and disassemble essential access and bolster platforms, for example,  as well as scaffold towers, cantilever frameworks, and asphalt and rooftop platforms. They should likewise position and remove specific gear for getting to the rig, for example, vertical steps, roof ladders and rope ladders.

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How To Become a Publicist

How to become a Publicist

What is a Publicist? 
A publicist is someone that is hired to represent and manage all media relationships for their client. They essentially as act as a barrier between the public, and the media. In order to be a successful candidate, you must have strong writing skills as you’ll be writing press kits, press releases, and emailing media professionals to secure interview time for your Artist, Politician, Actor, or Public Figure. In the production sector, you’ll usually be working to promote a particular film or TV project, or alternatively the on-screen talent. You will often create media campaigns and be supervising clients social media pages to make sure everything runs effortlessly, so digital experience on social media would be beneficial.

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6 Pieces Of Advice From Award Winning Directors

6 Pieces Of Advice From Award Winning Directors

No matter what they achieve in their career, every director was once a runner, a film student or a production assistant… So they are often keen on giving advice to young filmmakers. Here are our top picks:

Wes Anderson – Always start with your characters
During the 10th Rome Film Fest in 2015, the director from Houston, Texas, met the audience and, in a Q&A session, he shared several directorial tips like this one:

“For me a movie, the project usually begins almost always with a character or a group of characters. Usually there’s a sort of world… that’s tied in. But, for instance, the last film that I did, The Grand Budapest Hotel, there was a person we were modelling this role, this character who Ralph Fiennes plays in the film. There’s a real inspiration for him, and he was someone my co-writer Hugo Guinness [and I] were close to. In that case, if we put a style to it, it could be a literary style because of the way he talks. We wanted to write the way he talks to create a character in that way. But in that case it’s really the character that comes first.”

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7 Tips For Aspiring Screenwriters

7 Tips For Aspiring Screenwriters

Being the dream of plenty of film students, writers and even movie-enthusiasts, becoming a screenwriter can be one of the most competitive and frustrating journeys through the industry. Here are some tips aimed at those who are taking the first steps on this journey.

1. Read plenty of scripts
This should hopefully be obvious, but you can’t learn how to craft a successful screenplay just by yourself. You will need to read a lot of screenplays, from a lot of different screenwriters and across many different genres, from the classics to the latest hits, in order to get a full picture of the different techniques at your disposal, along with examples of good writing that works for the audience as well.

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7 Things You Shouldn’t Do On Your First Production Assistant Job

Being a Production Assistant is often the first step you take in the film industry. It can take you far, but it can also be hard. Here’s what you should avoid at all costs:

1. Showing up late
PAs are supposed to be the first ones on set, ready to get help (or breakfast) for whoever is in need. Moreover, this is your chance to show that you are a hard worker and slowing down the whole working day because you slept through your alarm is a really bad first impression. However, accidents can happen and if you have a good reason for being late and cannot possibly avoid it, then call and let them know.

2. Disappearing on set
Whether you need a smoke break or a quick run to the loo, the ADs and the rest of the crew is counting on your presence and help on set, so if you need to leave for a couple of minutes it is absolutely necessary to communicate it. Just make sure it’s not a time where you are needed and say you are going on a quick break on the walkie. Carry the walkie with you at all times and always let others know you got their message.

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