How To Become a Publicist

What They Do
A publicist is someone that is hired to represent and manage all media relationships for their client. They essentially as act as a barrier between the public, and the media. In order to be a successful candidate, you must have strong writing skills as you’ll be writing press kits, press releases, and emailing media professionals to secure interview time for your Artist, Politician, Actor, or Public Figure. In the production sector, you’ll usually be working to promote a particular film or TV project, or alternatively the on-screen talent. You will often create media campaigns and be supervising clients social media pages to make sure everything runs effortlessly, so digital experience on social media would be beneficial.

Formal Education
Those who go into the field of publicity usually have a BA degree in communications like Journalism, Marketing and Advertising, or Public Relations. Having knowledge of communications between the mass media and the public is essential to understanding how the industry works, and how you can successfully navigate using these to work in your favour. Being confident and having great social skills will be key when making those crucial professional relationships. You will also need to be flexible and well read, as you’ll be dealing with a wide variety of clients.

Read More

How To Become a Videographer

A Videographer is the person behind the camera, shooting all types of productions and events such as; corporate videos, B-roll footage for film and TV productions, weddings, business meetings, music videos and even Bar Mitzvas. Usually, the videographer will both shoot and edit the film, taking the project through to completion themselves.

High-end production equipment is no longer a necessity for Videographers because viral content doesn’t always need to be highly polished, and even entry-level kit can output professional HD quality footage. The only the thing that matters is what you’re shooting and how you frame it.

Thankfully due to the ever-increasing digital environment and cheaper editing software’s – becoming a Videographer is now more accessible to the masses. People are consuming more video than ever before, so there is a growing demand for content and an expanding industry for visual story tellers.

Read More

Network Across Rather Than Up

Network. Network. Network.
A word that has been drilled into our heads our entire careers. Here are some tips for anyone starting out in the creative industries.

When it comes to networking; actress, writer, director, and producer of the HBO hit series Insecure, Issa Rae offers a simple but effective solution for aspiring creatives.

“Who’s next to you? Who’s struggling? Who’s in the trenches with you? Who’s just as hungry as you are? Those are the people that you need to build with.”

Issa says she did not see herself being accurately portrayed in mainstream media, so she set out to fill the gap herself. She gained a massive following online through her mini-series The Misadventures of an Awkward Black Girl on YouTube, which garnered almost 20 million views.

Read More

How To Become a Producer

How To Become a Producer

What is a Producer?
A Producer is the individual that starts the entire production process of a TV series, play or film – they are the person responsible for finding a story a home and seeking out investors willing to fund the entire process, which will be crucial to the development of the story.

Things You’ll Need To Consider
First things first, you need to conduct a lot of research into finding a story that you think is worth producing. There are many forms that this can take, whether it is an original screenplay, a book, or just simply an idea that sounds incredible but hasn’t yet made its way on to paper (a lot of creative vision is essential to this process).

Secondly, a lot of time will be spent trying to get the rights to produce the story. Patience is needed for this, as it can months or years to secure the rights, and you are at the forefront of all the negotiations to bring the story to the screen.

Read More

How To Become a Location Scout

How To Become a Location Scout

What Is a Location Scout?
A location scout is essentially the director’s eyes and ears, and helps to develop the narrative by seeking out the perfect location. This is accomplished through finding a place that seamlessly follows the story at hand. The locations may vary from local suburban areas, to tropical islands in a foreign country.

The crucial thing to always keep in mind is the director’s intentions for the film, and the producer’s budget. If you sway too far out of the guidelines set by the producer then you risk bankrupting the film, or being told you aren’t fit to scout for that particular company. As a scout it is your responsibility to ensure that you are making the suitable decisions needed to help in the development process for the film, and to avoid pushing for a location that you have taken a particular liking to, despite it not having much relevance to the plot.

Read More

How To Kick-Start Your Career In Post Production

How To Kick-Start Your Career In Post Production

It takes a lot of time and work to shoot a feature film. But even when all the filming is done, the movie is only half-way through its path to be a finished product. The other half usually happens inside a post production house, where different departments work in synergy to put video and sound together into a blockbuster.

If you think post-production is the right path for you, here are the first steps to make your way into this world.

Figure out which department you want to work in
Most post-production companies structure their organisations (hence, human resources) along three main departments: Production, Editing and Sound. The first step, which you’ve probably already taken, is deciding which one of these is the right fit for you, depending on what you want your daily job to be like. Here’s an idea:

Read More

How To Work In The Film Industry Without Going To Film School

How To Work In The Film Industry Without Going To Film School

Don’t want to go through film school? Here are three career paths that might just suit you.

We all know how hard it can be to get your dream job in the industry. Most roles require specific education or training courses and, maybe most importantly, a great professional network within the sector. As a very diversified work environment though, there are a few jobs that actually require skills and knowledge from sectors which are completely tangential to film and TV.

The three career paths we selected in this article do not require any specific knowledge of directing, acting, screenwriting or editing, but nonetheless they can be very rewarding and well paid.

Read More

The 7 Golden Rules For Outstanding Camera Assistants

The 7 Golden Rules For Outstanding Camera Assistants

Be on time
Always plan to be on set 15 minutes before you are actually supposed to be there, so that, worst case scenario, you will end up being delayed by something unexpected but still be on time to start working. Remember that by being late, you slow down the whole production process, and especially for small productions, seizing every hour of shooting is crucial.

Bring your own tools
A lot of inexperienced ACs spend their whole first job asking other assistants to borrow gear and tools. While obviously it will take you a few years of practice (and savings) to put together a complete toolset, starting with bringing the basics with you will make you look reliable and committed. These basics may include screwdrivers, pliers, scissors, wrenches, hex keys, markers, measuring tape, a flashlight, along with all the gear to keep cameras and lenses clean.

Always take care of the equipment on set
Whether it’s about lowering the camera on the tripod while it’s not being used, or covering the gear from the rain as the sky gets cloudy, doing everything in your power to make sure all of the equipment gets to the end of the day in perfect condition is your main responsibility. By doing so, not only will you help the production save money by avoiding expensive repairs, but you also show your professionalism and trustworthiness.

Read More

How To Become a Production Co-ordinator

How To Become a Production Co-ordinator

The production office, taking care of all the administrative side of films and TV production, is run by the Production Co-Ordinator, who acts as a reference point for the rest the crew before and during production.

What is the Job?
Immediately after the beginning of pre-production, the Production Co-Ordinator sets up the production office, taking care of providing equipment and supplies, as well as hiring staff. Then they proceed to organise travel, accommodation, paperwork (work permits and visa), crew and cast lists, and script editing and revision.

During shooting, they deal with day to day updates such as crew and cast list changes, call sheets, script edits and so on. They check the transport requirements for the day and make sure everything is delivered on set on time.

Read More

7 Things You Shouldn’t Do On Your First Production Assistant Job

Being a Production Assistant is often the first step you take in the film industry. It can take you far, but it can also be hard. Here’s what you should avoid at all costs:

1. Showing up late
PAs are supposed to be the first ones on set, ready to get help (or breakfast) for whoever is in need. Moreover, this is your chance to show that you are a hard worker and slowing down the whole working day because you slept through your alarm is a really bad first impression. However, accidents can happen and if you have a good reason for being late and cannot possibly avoid it, then call and let them know.

2. Disappearing on set
Whether you need a smoke break or a quick run to the loo, the ADs and the rest of the crew is counting on your presence and help on set, so if you need to leave for a couple of minutes it is absolutely necessary to communicate it. Just make sure it’s not a time where you are needed and say you are going on a quick break on the walkie. Carry the walkie with you at all times and always let others know you got their message.

Read More