How To Become an Art Department Assistant

How To Become an Art Department Assistant

Overseen by the Production Designer, the art department is responsible for the aesthetic choices of everything within a film. The roles are split between designing and selecting off-set, and those working on set. The art department is usually the largest on set.

What is the Job?
Art Department Assistants help translate initial sketches into worked-up drawings from which a variety of craftsmen build sets or adapt locations. During a shoot, more experienced assistants can be expected to work on the studio floor as standby art directors. Staying close to the playback monitor, and being on hand to make changes to the set if asked by the Director of Photography who may ask to acquire a prop at the last minute. They also carry out sit surveys of the locations to work from, and help to supervise the construction of the sets.

An Art Department Assistant can also be asked to complete a range of other tasks from shopping and making tea and coffee, tobuying art materials and issuing drawings.

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Student View: What Happens After You Graduate?

Sharon Boyd looks at the first steps to take when graduating from a Media degree:

What Happens After You Graduate?

So you’ve spent three years studying the likes of Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno and W. J. T. Mitchell alongside writing scripts, shooting on a Sony HDW750P or a Canon 7D, colour correcting in Final Cut Pro or Avid, and learning to analyse and think critically about the media world. Now what? For some of you it might be a case of having a night on the piss and sitting on your arse for the remainder of the summer, maybe applying to the odd job. For others, perhaps you would rather not waste your £27,000 costing 2:1 degree by living off dole money and continuing the typical student life of sleeping all-day and instead actually start making yourself as employable as possible by getting a foot in the door and beginning your career in the media industry.

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Student View: Make The Most Of Your University Network

Sharon Boyd looks at how to use your university connections to improve your employability whilst you study:

Make The Most Of Your University Network

The general impression of undergraduates isn’t always a favourable one. Frequently when thinking of student life we conjure up images of intoxicated individuals stealing traffic cones, and spending the majority of the sunlight hours sleeping off hangovers, and those regretful decisions of choosing to have garlic mayo on their kebab the night before. But alongside the parties, many of these students still manage to be academically successful by having a good balance between their social life and studies, which is key for any student wanting to do well but have fun at the same time.

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Personalities & Working In The Media

Sharon Boyd asks whether you have to be an extrovert in order to have a successful career in the media sector:

Personalities & Working In The Media

The media industry is one in which working with people is inevitable, so if you’re not really a people person then you should consider this aspect of having an occupation in this particular industry. There are many different personality types, some people are extrovert, others are introvert, and still others are a blend of the two. When choosing a career path you should think about how your personality could impact you in the work that you want to do.

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Student View: Do You Really Need a Media Degree?

Sharon Boyd takes a look at whether a Media degree is really necessary in order to start a career in TV and film production:

Do You Really Need a Media Degree?

You study a media based degree and therefore consider yourself to be a media practitioner, maybe you know how to cut a few clips together and add a couple of effects in Final Cut Pro? Maybe you can snap a few photographs on a ‘real’ camera rather than using Instagram? Or maybe you can sit down and instantly write what you believe to be an award winning script? I’m going to stop you there. This does not make you an editor, or a photographer, or a scriptwriter. Maybe you aren’t an amateur, but neither are you a professional, well not quite yet anyway.

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Student View: How To Find The Media Course For You

Sharon Boyd takes a look at the huge range of different university courses available to those looking to start out in the media industries:

How To Find The Media Course For You

It is clear that there are a wide range of media based degrees that exist and every University course is going to differ in what they teach you and how they teach you. Some degrees tend to be heavily theory based, while others focus more on the practical aspects of the media, and still others blend both theory and practice together. When researching what degree to choose prospective students need to understand what they are actually applying to do, and often there is a bombardment of search results which can make it hard to know where to start.

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National Insurance Reforms: Are You Eligible For a Refund?

With less than a month to go before changes to National Insurance (NI) come into force, it seems that many people working in the entertainment industry have been asking the same two questions: am I affected and, if so, is there anything that I can or should do?

Before we address these questions, let’s get an overview of the legislation.

Dual status

Under the current system, those working in film, TV, theatre, radio and commercial production are treated as employed for NI purposes and self-employed for income tax purposes. This enables low-income earners to qualify for state benefits such as Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA), which can offer vital income when between roles.

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The Advantages Of Blogging For Freelancers

The Advantages Of Blogging For Freelancers

Blogging has endured a somewhat torrid time within the online community recently with the use of social media seemingly making it redundant. Yet, from a marketing perspective, there are a number of reasons to use a blog to further promote your work. It would be naive to assume that being active on social media platforms signifies the demise of blogging for self-promotion, as an established social media presence could be used to direct potential employers to a more personalised exhibition of your work, interests and skillset.

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Using Social Media Platforms To Build a Career Profile

Social media has become one of the best ways to build an online profile as a freelancer working within the media industry. It can be a useful method of getting traffic through to your website or ProductionBase profile and getting exposure that you wouldn’t necessarily achieve through other avenues. Plus, it enables freelancers to connect with other like-minded professionals to share experiences and advice, as well as job leads. Here are a few tips on how to make the most of marketing yourself through the successful social media platforms Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Twitter

Using Social Media Platforms To Build a Career Profile

Twitter can be a great connection point between freelancers and potential clients, as social media platforms like twitter have provided not only easier access to production companies but an easy way of keeping your clients up-to-date regularly. The real advantage of Twitter is that as there is a limited amount of characters, it is quick and easy to keep track of the issues and opportunities arising within the media industry in a short period of time. Here are a few tips on how to make the most of your twitter account:

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How To Become a Production Coordinator

How To Become a Production Coordinator

Working as a Production Coordinator is one of the most responsible positions within a production crew. Being depended on for the day-to-day working of the production, the position is often one of the most enduring but working as a co-ordinator is a great opportunity to develop your craft as a Producer and enhance your chances of progressing further in the department.

What is the Job?
Production Coordinators are depended on to ensure that the production office is run within the parameters outlined by the Production Manager. As an office-based position, the Production Coordinator is responsible for the office when the Production Manager is committed on set.

The Production Coordinator’s role varies through each phase of production depending on the Production Manager. During pre-production, they are responsible for the purchasing of equipment and office supplies, the distribution of shooting schedules, work permits, cast lists and script revisions as well as travel and accommodation for cast and crew, and insurance for vehicles and equipment involved in the shoot.

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